Difference between revisions of "Gregorian calendar"

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The [[Gregorian calendar]] is the current calendar for the people of [[Earth]] and [[Luna]], and still the most widely-used system of timekeeping among [[human]]ity.  The other two competing systems are the [[Helios Calendar]] and the [[Arean calendar]], as a standard timekeeping measure and a timekeeping system for [[Mars]], respectively.
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The [[Gregorian calendar]] was the calendar for the people of [[Earth]] and [[Luna]], and until the [[Purge]], was the most widely-used system of timekeeping among [[human]]ity.  The other two competing systems were the [[Helios Calendar]] and the [[Arean calendar]], as a standard timekeeping measure and a timekeeping system for [[Mars]], respectively.
  
 
* [http://ss.anenris.com/resources/calendar.html Solar Storms Calendar Converter]
 
* [http://ss.anenris.com/resources/calendar.html Solar Storms Calendar Converter]
 
* One modification to the calendar has been made.  Every 4,000 years is considered to be a skip year, where a leap year is not counted, in order to bring the calendar closer in line with the mean tropical year.
 
* One modification to the calendar has been made.  Every 4,000 years is considered to be a skip year, where a leap year is not counted, in order to bring the calendar closer in line with the mean tropical year.
  
The rising popularity of the [[Helios Calendar]], the slow diaspora of [[human]]kind, combined with the nearly unworkable problem of keeping the calendar truly intact leads many to expect that it will be left to die, likely along with the [[Arean calendar]], in twenty thousand years or soEventually all that will remain is the echo of the second and hour in the more advanced calendar that were once based off of [[Earth]]'s rotation.
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Even before the [[21st century]], many attempts to reform the [[Terran]] calendar had been made.  They all failed, as did further attempts through the [[22nd century]].  The next winner would be a calendar that actually took the slowing of [[Earth]]'s rotation into account, but the potential for [[human]] intervention made this somewhat suspectThe [[Solarian Purge]] effectively ended this calendar, as calculating for delta T meant that the only 'guaranteed' unit of time was the year.  Adding in the concept of [[drift]] was also a bit much, and many stuck with the Helios calendar, sometimes using the [[Arean]] one to be odd.
  
== Calendar Reform ==
 
Even before the [[21st century]], many attempts to reform the [[Terran]] calendar had been made.  They all failed, as did further attempts through the [[22nd century]].  The next winner would be a calendar that actually took the slowing of [[Earth]]'s rotation into account, but the potential for [[human]] intervention makes this somewhat suspect.
 
  
 
{{SSG}}
 
{{SSG}}

Latest revision as of 04:13, 17 April 2007

The Gregorian calendar was the calendar for the people of Earth and Luna, and until the Purge, was the most widely-used system of timekeeping among humanity. The other two competing systems were the Helios Calendar and the Arean calendar, as a standard timekeeping measure and a timekeeping system for Mars, respectively.

  • Solar Storms Calendar Converter
  • One modification to the calendar has been made. Every 4,000 years is considered to be a skip year, where a leap year is not counted, in order to bring the calendar closer in line with the mean tropical year.

Even before the 21st century, many attempts to reform the Terran calendar had been made. They all failed, as did further attempts through the 22nd century. The next winner would be a calendar that actually took the slowing of Earth's rotation into account, but the potential for human intervention made this somewhat suspect. The Solarian Purge effectively ended this calendar, as calculating for delta T meant that the only 'guaranteed' unit of time was the year. Adding in the concept of drift was also a bit much, and many stuck with the Helios calendar, sometimes using the Arean one to be odd.


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